Checklist To Buy a Used Car in UAE

If you have moved to Dubai and you are not very familiar with the precepts to live in Dubai or to buy or sell the assets or the cars or anything else like this, you may need proper direction for it. If you have some relatives already living in any part of the UAE, you may get the proper guidance from them. But if you are new and want to buy or sell any car in Dubai, you should follow this ultimate guide and we are sure will not find any difficulty in finding a car for you. Have a look at the checklist we have made for you. 

 Find a Used Car for Sale

When you have decided to buy a car in the UAE, first of all, you need to find out where you can get a used car which is suitable to buy. If you are in Dubai, try and visit Ras Al Khor, visit the Auto Market in Sharjah, in Abu Dhabi, you can go to the Souq Al Haraj which is called the motor world there. 

If you find a private seller, you may negotiate with him, or you may visit the online websites which buy and sell used cars. After choosing a suitable option to find a car, go find a car for yourself. You will have many options to select a suitable car for you. Now, before making a deal with the seller of the car, have a look at the few things as mentioned below. 

Must Check the Age

It is for sure that a used car will be much cheaper than a brand new car. But you have to get assured that the car you are going to buy must be less in age. The maximum age of the car … Read the rest

Benefits of Vehicle Fleet Maintenance Software

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Vehicle Fleet maintenance Software is an ideal solution for tracking the maintenance of the vehicle fleet. Different cars or trucks may approach different maintenance dates, depending on their lifespan and the amount of wear and tear they may have suffered. It makes the work of tracking convenient by giving organizing, preventive, and maintenance information of your fleet. This software can benefit organizations in a wide variety of industries with any size of fleets, no matter how big or small it is. A good understanding of the benefits will allow you to make informed decisions as to whether this software is a wise investment for your organization.

1.Robust fuel tracking – One of the highest operational costs of the fleet is the fuel. Monitor the fuel efficiency of your fleet over time and prepare a fuel module for fleet maintenance software. A fuel module will allow you to enter fueling transactions manually. Additionally, you can import data from external fueling systems and store fluids in inventory.

2. Easy to incorporate new trucks into your fleet – For any new vehicle, the existing maintenance schedule of the fleet can be copied and applied. This task will ultimately help in reducing the time required to include a new car or truck in your fleet maintenance software. When the new car detail is entered into the system, there will be details about its different parts’ maintenance schedules. The solution will automatically remind you at the right time when such maintenance is due.

3. Real-time access to data – The maintenance software gives real-time access to up-to-data on the fleet. To maintain the task, increase accountability, and to stay connected to the data, it will allow the management team to make necessary arrangements. Imagine if a fleet owner comes to know very late about a … Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest

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Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest

sample accessily post 3

Canva Uncovered: How A Young Australian Kitesurfer Built A $3.2 Billion (Profitable!) Startup Phenom

On a steamy May morning in 2013, Canva CEO Melanie Perkins found herself adrift on a kiteboard in the channel between billionaire Richard Branson’s private Necker and Moskito islands. Her 30-foot sail floating deflated and useless beside her in the strong eastern Caribbean current, the 26-year-old entrepreneur waited for hours to be rescued. As she treaded water, her left leg scarred by a past collision with a coral reef, she reminded herself that her dangerous new hobby was worth it. After all, it was key to the fundraising strategy for the design-software startup she’d cofounded with her boyfriend six years before. Canva was based in Australia, thousands of miles from tech’s Silicon Valley power corridor. Getting a meeting—much less funding—was proving tough. Perkins heard “no” from more than 100 investors. So when she met the organizer of a group of kitesurfing venture capitalists at a pitch competition in her native Perth, Perkins got to training. The next time the group met to hear startup pitches and potentially write crucial early-stage funding checks, she’d have a seat at the table—even if it meant having to brave treacherous waters. “It was like, risk: serious damage; reward: start company,” Perkins says. “If you get your foot in the door just a tiny bit, you have to kind of wedge it all the way in.” Such perseverance has long been a necessity at Canva, which began as a modest yearbook-design business in the state capital of Perth on Australia’s west coast. From those remote origins, Canva has grown into a global juggernaut. Twenty-million-plus users from 190 countries use the company’s “freemium” Web-based app to design everything from splashy Pinterest graphics to elegant restaurant menus. Besides an impossible-to-beat price (millions of… Read the rest